Sunday, February 28, 2010

The Great Blizzard of March 1, 1914

New Eygpt
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Whiting
CITY BREAKS FREE FROM SNOW'S GRIP; Warm Sun and 17,000 Men Do Much to Clear the Busiest Thoroughfares.
March 4, 1914, Wednesday

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9906E1DD113FE633A25757C0A9659C946596D6CF


1914 March 1 Heavy Wet Snow/High Winds
“The worst since '88,” crippled New York and New Jersey; Asbury Park, NJ, received 24" of snow; New York’s barometer dipped to a record 28.38"; downed wires and poles disrupted communications and power in New Jersey.

New Eygpt


WIRES DEFIED STORM IN $5,000,000 CABLE; Breakdown Prevented by American Telephone and Telegraph's Underground Lines.
March 8, 1914, Sunday
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=9A01E2DD163AE633A2575BC0A9659C946596D6CF

STORM'S DAMAGE RAPIDLY REPAIRED; New Jersey Proves the Worst Sufferer -- Wire Loss Is About $1,300,000.
March 5, 1914, Thursday

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9D01E4DD1E3AE733A25756C0A9659C946596D6CF

CITY BREAKS FREE FROM SNOW'S GRIP; Warm Sun and 17,000 Men Do Much to Clear the Busiest Thoroughfares.
March 4, 1914, Wednesday

http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9906E1DD113FE633A25757C0A9659C946596D6CF

First Trains Sent West After Block of More Than 24 Hours; UNITE TO RELIEVE THE CITY
March 3, 1914, Tuesday
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9803EED91730E733A25750C0A9659C946596D6CF

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